Mae Govannen. And whatnot.

scorsece:

I DO NOT UNDERSTAND PEOPLE WHO DON’T GET EMOTIONALLY INVESTED IN MOVIES LIKE HOW DO YOU NOT FALL IN LOVE OVER AND OVER WITH CHARACTERS AND DROOL OVER CINEMATOGRAPHY AND CRY AT THE SOUNDTRACKS AND STOP BREATHING OVER THE BEAUTY OF THE WORDS I GO INTO A CINEMA AND I WALK OUT A DIFFERENT PERSON HOW DOES THIS NOT HAPPEN TO EVERYONE???/

one gif set per episode || doctor who 

 “boom town” : season 1, episode 11

Ten + his blue suit

tranquilsouls:

scumi:

most favorite quote of all time.

wow

tranquilsouls:

scumi:

most favorite quote of all time.

wow

japharts:

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Sometimes you just…

tennantmeister:

[source]

hangifs:

The guys in France, Italy, and England.  

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

My head! I’m having a neuron implosion. I need..

polycoria:

thegardenfox:

awesomephilia:

This little kid fell and the seal seemed to be very worried about her

“Look at me I’m beautiful and graceful and oh shit kid you ok”

That’s a sea lion.

polycoria:

thegardenfox:

awesomephilia:

This little kid fell and the seal seemed to be very worried about her

“Look at me I’m beautiful and graceful and oh shit kid you ok”

That’s a sea lion.

kneelbeforemistressphil:

kaalashnikov:

your-continuum:

kaalashnikov:

do you ever sit there and wonder what life must be like for people without anxiety

like they just

DO THINGS

without worrying about them first

wow

Anxiety is an excuse

I hope you walk barefoot on a world of legos for the rest of your life

The first time Tony Stark had an anxiety attack he thought he had been poisoned.

think about that